Enceladus Titan - a satellite with an atmosphere Rhea

Phoebe - a captured KBO

The Satellites of Saturn

Details about Saturn's 60 moons

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Name
Diameter(s)
(km)
Mean Distance
From Planet
(×103 km)
Rotational
Period
(days)
Orbital
Period
(days)
Orbital
Inclination
Orbital
Eccentricity
Albedo
(%)
Regular Direct Satellites
Pan 20 133.583   0.5750 0 50
Daphnis 7 136.500   0.594 0  
Atlas 37 × 34.4 × 27 137.670   0.6019 0.3° 0 80
Prometheus 148 × 100 × 68 139.353   0.6130 0.0024 50
Pandora 110 × 88 × 62 141.700   0.6285 0.0042 70
Epimetheus 138 × 110 × 110 151.422 0.6942 0.6942 0.335° 0.021 80
Janus 194 × 190 × 154 151.472 0.6945 0.6945 0.165° 0.007 90
Mimas 209 × 392 × 382 185.52 0.9424 0.9424 1.566° 0.0202 50
Methone 3 194   1.01 0  
60th 2 ?   ? ?  
Pallene 4 211   1.14 0  
Enceladus 512 × 494 × 490 238.02 1.3702 1.3702 0.01° 0.0045 100
Telesto 30 × 25 × 15 294.66   1.8878 1.158° 0.001 100
Tethys 1072 × 1056 × 1052 294.66 1.8878 1.8878 1.86° 0.000 90
Calypso 30 × 16 × 16 294.66   1.8878 1.473° 0.001 100
Dione 1,118 377.40 2.7369 2.7369 0.02° 0.0022 70
Helene 36 × 32 × 30 377.40   2.7369 0.212° 0.005 70
Polydeuces 4 377.40   2.7369 0  
Rhea 1,528 527.04 4.5175 4.5175 0.327° 0.0010 70
Titan 5,150 1,221.83 15.945421 15.945421 1.634° 0.0292 22
Hyperion 370 × 280 × 226 1,481.1 Chaotic 21.276609 0.468° 0.018 30
The Peculiar Iapetus
Iapetus 1,436 3,560.8 79.330183 79.330183 14.72° 0.0283 5 - 50
Irregular Direct Satellites
Kiviuq 16 11,365   449.2 46.16° 0.334  
Ijiraq 12 11,440   451.5 46.74° 0.322  
Paaliaq 22 15,199   686.9 45.13° 0.364  
Albiorix 32 16,404   783.5 33.98° 0.478  
Bebhionn 6 16,950   822 41.0° 0.336  
Erriapo 10 17,616   871.9 34.45° 0.474  
S/2007 S1 7 17,920   895 49.83° 0.107  
Siarnaq 40 18,160   893.1 45.56° 0.295  
Tarvos 15 18,247   925.6 33.51° 0.531  
Irregular Retrograde Satellites
Phoebe 230 × 220 × 210 12,952 0.5 -548.2 174.8° 0.164 6
Skathi 8 15,647   -728.9 152.7° 0.270  
S/2007 S2 6 16,560   -800 176.7° 0.218  
Skoll 6 17,665   -878.3 161.2° 0.464  
S/2006 S4 6 18,105   -905 172.7° 0.374  
S/2004 S13 6 18,450   -906 167.4° 0.273  
S/2004 S17 6 18,600   -986 166.6° 0.259  
S/2006 S6 6 18,600   -942 162.9° 0.192  
Mundilfari 7 18,709   -951.4 167.5° 0.208  
Narvi 7 18,719   -956.2 134.6° 0.352  
Bergelmir 6 18,750   -1,008 156.9° 0.180  
S/2006 S1 6 18,981   -970 154.2° 0.130  
Hyrokkin 8 19,338   -931.8 151.4° 0.333  
Aegir 6 19,350   -1,026 167.0° 0.241  
Suttungr 7 19,463   -1,016.3 175.8° 0.114  
S/2004 S12 5 19,650   -1,048 164.0° 0.401  
Bestla 7 19,650   -1,052 147.4° 0.795  
Farbauti 5 19,800   -1,077 157.6° 0.235  
S/2004 S07 6 19,800   -1,103 165.1° 0.580  
Hati 6 19,950   -1,081 162.7° 0.292  
S/2007 S3 5 20,159   -1,100 177.2° 0.130  
Thrymr 7 20,382   -1,086.9 175.8° 0.470  
S/2006 S3 6 21,132   -1,142 150.8° 0.471  
Kari 7 22,118   -1,233.6 156.3° 0.478  
Fenrir 4 22,200   -1,271 163.0° 0.135  
Fornjot 6 22,200   -1,355 168.0° 0.213  
Surtur 6 22,707   -1,297.7 177.5° 0.451  
Loge 6 23,065   -1,312.0 167.9° 0.187  
Ymir 18 23,096   -1,312.4 173.1° 0.333  

Name

The inner satellites of Saturn have names associated with classical Greek mythology. Un-named satellites are in blue.

Diameter

Titan is one of the largest satellites in the Solar System. It is larger than the planet Mercury and is large enough to have a substantial atmosphere.

Most of the other satellites are irregularly shaped bodies; only three are over 1000km in diameter.

The outer satellites are less than 100km in diameter apart from Phoebe. They may be captured asteroids.

Mean Distance From Planet

Some of the inner satellites of Saturn are bunched together. The closest ones are very close to the planet's ring system.

Rotational and Orbital Periods

About half of Saturn's satellites rotate in the same period as they revolve around the planet. This is caused by the strong tidal forces exerted by the planet on the satellite. The outer satellites are less affected by tidal forces.

As seen from above the north pole of the Earth, most of the planets and satellites revolve in an anticlockwise direction. This is called Direct or Prograde Motion. Some satellites revolve in a clockwise sense. This is called Retrograde Motion and is shown by the presence of a minus sign. Phoebe and the other outer satellites revolve in the retrograde direction.

Orbital Inclination

This is the angle of inclination of the satellite orbits compared to the planet's equatorial plane. Most of Saturn's inner satellites orbit very close to the planet's equator, apart from Iapetus. The outer satellites have higher inclinations.

Orbital Eccentricity

The orbits of Saturns's inner satellites are nearly circular. The outer ones have eccentric orbits. The recently discovered S/2004 S18 has the solar system's most eccentric satellite orbit.

Albedo

This is the percentage of sunlight that is reflected by the satellites. Saturn's satellites tend to be very reflective. They are probably icy bodies.

Iapetus has one very dark side and one bright side; probably the result of a collision or a close encounter with the planet's rings.


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